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Immigration Law Services | Jubilee Immigration Advocates

We welcome simple and complex cases. Family based immigration, Relief for victims of abuse and violence (U Visa, VAWA, Asylum, SIJS), Deportation defense, DACA, Citizenship, and more.

Immigration. Deportation. Citizenship.

Our attorneys provide high-quality legal representation for immigrants. Our services are based on a flat fee.  We do not charge by the hour.  The fee varies depending on your income, the type of case, and the level of complexity. We charge a small fee for the initial consultation. We also offer some pro bono service. Please contact us if you have any questions. We seek to make excellent immigration legal services affordable. 

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Relief for Victims of Abuse and Violence

U Visa

Immigrants who have been victims of certain violent crimes in the U.S., such as domestic violence or assault, may be eligible for a U visa. The crime must have been reported to law enforcement, often the police.  The victim must have cooperated with the criminal investigation and suffered substantial mental or physical harm. A U-visa provides a work permit and is a potential pathway to citizenship. 

VAWA

VAWA stands for the Violence Against Women Act. Domestic violence victims who have been abused by their U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident spouse or parent may apply for legal immigration status on their own, without the help of the abusive spouse or parent.  VAWA provides a work permit and is a potential pathway to citizenship. 

Asylum

Immigrants who are afraid to return to their home country due to persecution because of their race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group may be eligible for asylum and permitted to remain in the U.S. Applicants for asylum may be eligible for a work permit while their case is pending. Asylum is a potential pathway to citizenship.

SIJS

SIJS stands for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status. Children who have been abused, abandoned or neglected by at least one parent may be eligible to become legal permanent residents. The applicant must be under age 21 and have a state court order with specific findings related to the custody and care of the applicant.  SIJS is a potential pathway to citizenship.


Deportation Defense

Immigrants who are in deportation or removal proceedings may be eligible for certain types of relief.  Common types of relief are asylum, U visa, VAWA, SIJS, cancellation of removal, adjustment of status through a family member, or exercise of prosecutorial discretion to administratively close the case. Those who are detained may be eligible to be released on bond after a hearing before an immigration judge.


Family Based Immigration

U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents may apply for certain family members to become legal permanent residents. Family member applicants who live outside the U.S. must apply for an immigrant visa from the U.S. consulate overseas before they can enter the U.S. and get their green card. Some family members who are already in the U.S. may be eligible to change their immigration status and get their green card while remaining in the U.S.


Citizenship

Legal permanent residents may be eligible to become U.S. citizens or to "naturalize" after living in the U.S. for 3 to 5 years, if they meet certain requirements. They must also pass an English and U.S. civics test. Some individuals who have been legal permanent residents for at least 15 to 20 years may not have to take the English and/or civics part of the test. Persons with certain disabilities may also be exempt from parts of the test. 


Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. before age 16 and have lived in the U.S. from June 15, 2007 to the present may be eligible for protection from deportation under DACA.  Applicants must have been under age 31 on June 15, 2012 and meet certain educational requirements. DACA provides a work permit that may be renewed but is not a pathway to citizenship.


Please call us at 415.813.1958 to schedule a consultation.